Questions and Answers

Interview Questions

Susan Ortlieb of Suko's Notebook wrote: "Once I started reading The Rebels of Cordovia, I greatly looked forward to my time with this book, because the author is a truly terrific storyteller. She brings the characters to life through their mannerisms and conversations with each other. Linda Weaver Clarke writes with passion and grace, and the love story in this book is simply wonderful. In fact, this aspect of the story was the strongest draw for me. (Is it just me, or are love stories set in the past more romantic than those set in the present day?) I thought that Robin and Daniel sounded perfect for each other, and I enjoyed the steady development of their relationship. Suitable for young adults and adults, this charming book was a pleasure to read, and I relished it. The Rebels of Cordovia is another wonderful book by Linda Weaver Clarke!"

The Rebel Series has been receiving wonderful reviews. Where did you get your inspiration for this series?

All three books in this series are love stories set in the late 1700s. The Rebel Series was inspired by the stories of the American patriots who fought to be free from the dictatorship and tyranny of a king. It's a theme that is dear to me. Liberty is something that I cherish. It's a precious gift given to us by those who fought so valiantly. The miracles that happened during that war made me realize that God was watching over us. When I read the stories of the American Revolution, my heart swells with gratitude for those loyal patriots. When I look at our flag and pledge allegiance to it, tears well up in my eyes. When I listen to The Star Spangled Banner I get choked up. Especially when it"s sung by a choir.

How would you describe The Rebel Series?

The Rebel Series is a mixture of romance and adventure. I absolutely love stories that are page-turners, which have some mystery and suspense. I love a romance where the man and woman know they are meant for one another and have a strong belief in God. Even though there are trials along the way, they never give up on the other. I also like strong women characters in a story.

Stories set in the 1700s and 1800s are so fascinating to me. It's during a time when men defended a lady's honor and treated women with respect. The women, on the other hand, were not pansies by any means. They knew their rights and demanded respect. My great, great grandmother lived back then and she was brave and independent. I love the fact that people fought for what they believed in.

Had the idea for this series been on your mind for a while?

I had the idea of a country that had to fight for its liberty and the idea stayed in my mind for a long time until I created this story.

How did you get started in this genre?

After writing my ancestors' biographies, I turned to historical fiction. You could say that my ancestors were the inspiration for getting me started. After writing several historical romances, I wrote some cozy mysteries but came back to period romance after a while. I love writing about days long past.

What kind of research did you do for this series?

When I did some research about the "waltz," I was surprised by what I found. The peasants were the first to dance the waltz. It was such fun that bored noblemen would sneak out and go to the country-dances. The Oxford English Dictionary back then called the waltz "riotous and indecent."

In a 1771 German novel, someone complains about the "newly-introduced waltz" among the aristocrats. He wrote: "When he put his arm around her, pressed her to his breast, cavorted with her in the shameless, indecent whirling-dance of the Germans and engaged in a familiarity that broke all the bounds of good breeding—then my silent misery turned into burning rage." Haha. It finally became fashionable in Great Britain when the wife of a Russian ambassador endorsed it.

I learned some interesting facts about lamplighters. The city is careful about who they hire because lamplighters also act as night watchmen and need to be trustworthy. I learned that the job is usually handed down from father to son and kept within the family. I love doing research.

©Copyright 2005, Linda Weaver Clarke